“Death is Wrong”, a New Children’s Book, Signals Transhumanism

March 16, 2014 — Leave a comment
Cover of the New Children's Book

Cover of the New Children’s Book

A Little Something for the Kids

Transhumanism has arrived for our children with a new  book  just for them entitled  Death is Wrong. The book is by Gennady Stolyarov II and illustrated by Wendy Stolyarov. The endeavor is even crowd-funding free copies for kids.  The  somewhat creepy cover  says it all:  a stoic male child, in collar and tie,  banishes the grim reaper.

Transhumanism is a philosophical way of life  where humanity and technology work together, indeed, not hand in hand, but technically inside one another,  to reach perfection. Theoretically such  synergistic perfection would lead to a transhuman, or also known as a posthuman,  leaving the imperfect mortal coil behind , emerging  as an immortal.

Illustartion Inside The Book: Mom Explains the Sad Facts of Life

Illustration  Inside The Book: Mom Explains the Sad Facts of Life

War’s Drum Beat

The Catholic Church has made it  clear on its stance on transhumanism.  It has  declared war against it. The  manifesto entitled the Madrid Declaration on Science and Life  takes a grim view. The simple long/short of the paper  is that  we are made in the image of God, therefore we should not tamper with that which is  sacred.

Yet, one could look at the words in Genesis where God tells humankind  to take dominion over the earth and skies. Would that, too, not be our own bodies?  Did  Paul of Tarsus not speak of the spiritual  perfection to which all people should   strive? Would such spiritual perfection include giving our bodies more time by  replacing our parts that bleed and sweat and die?

Hey, we all have some tin, plastic, or nanotech in us, already….right ? Who really cares if the ratio of plastic to flesh changes rather….er… dramatically?

We see what happens when technology gets the better of us in the  movie adaptations of  Phillip K.  Dick’s  brilliant works. In both Minority Report, and Bladerunner, the endings feature the protagonists fleeing from the cities of technology,  returning to the forest where balance and nature reign.

The Forever Child Among Us Now

A few years ago, we were saying that there is a child now walking the earth that will live for 200 years. But now, we have  made adjustments. The new talk is that there is a child who walks who will live forever. The scary-bright Ray Kurzweil, who pops  150 vitamin and nutrient pills a day to keep alive , proclaims that if aging people can tough it out for  another twenty years, they will be able to live  forever, too.

Kurzweil is now consulting with  the hot epicenter of culture: Google. And what about Google’s Sergei Brin  who is now 40 and worried about his Parkinson’s  gene kicking in? Would be not put his billionaire’s quarry to  work to change his troubled gene?  Has he not already provided the OK Glass for our eyes so we may see new things?

A Few Questions

Does transhumanism trivialize the sacredness of humanness? Does it negate the spiritual life?

There is no question that Transhumanism has arrived. It has now even been wrapped in a  creepy propaganda package for our kids. They probably have no objection to Transhumanism.

From the book description:

If you have ever asked, “Why do people have to die?” then this book is for you. The answer is that no, death is not necessary, inevitable, or good. In fact, death is wrong. Death is the enemy of us all, to be fought with medicine, science, and technology. This book introduces you to the greatest, most challenging, most revolutionary movement to radically extend human lifespans so that you might not have to die at all. 

Our kids would see this as epic. And it most certainly is.

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